Cannibalism Uncovered at Jamestown Settlement

  • Despite John Smith’s heroic accounts, the 1607 English settlement at Jamestown (VA) was just hard and not at well planned. Food? Scarce for many reasons, but on starving, cannibalism became a option. (See The New York Times, 2-May-2013.) Not surprising really, since humans in extremity will resort to survival by any means. The same happened more recently in the 19th century during the Donner Party expedition.

     

    More interesting is James Horn’s perspective in a followup NY Times Op-Ed article (4-May-2013), which suggests that while the English settlers feared cannibalism by the American Natives, in fact, they projected it, and ironically they themselves were forced to practice it.

JDN | 20-May-2013

That Boston Paul Revere knew is so completely gone, it is almost useless to hunt for it. The cutting-down of of hills and building-out of new land has gone on for a century and a half. When in 1756 his artillery train trundled into Boston, they entered over ‘The Neck.’ It was the only land approach to the town. On his right was Roxbury Harbor, to his left the Back Bay, and for a mile he followed an ill-paved, desolate cart path over mudflats. The first sign of civilization was the gallows and around it the graves of criminals and suicides marked with heaps of stone.

Esther Forbes
Paul Revere & The World He Lived In (1942)