Battles

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Battle Location End Date Sort descending
Battle of Lexington / Concord Massachusetts 19-Apr-1775
Battle of Fort Ticonderoga New York 10-May-1775
Battle of Bunker Hill Massachusetts 17-Jun-1775
Battle of Quebec Quebec, Canada 31-Dec-1775
Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge North Carolina 27-Feb-1776
Fortification of Dorchester Heights Massachusetts 04-Mar-1776
Battle of Long Island New York 27-Aug-1776
Battle of Harlem Heights New York 16-Sep-1776
Battle of Valcour Island New York 11-Oct-1776
Battle of White Plains New York 28-Oct-1776
Battle of Fort Washington New York 16-Nov-1776
Battle of Trenton New Jersey 26-Dec-1776
Battle of Princeton New Jersey 03-Jan-1777
Siege of Fort Ticonderoga New York 06-Jul-1777
Battle of Oriskany New York 06-Aug-1777
Battle of Bennington New York 16-Aug-1777
Battle of Brandywine Pennsylvania 11-Sep-1777
Battle of Germantown Pennsylvania 04-Oct-1777
Battle of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton New York 06-Oct-1777
Battles of Saratoga New York 07-Oct-1777
Battle of Red Bank (Fort Mercer) New Jersey 22-Oct-1777
Siege of Mud Island Fort (Fort Mifflin) Pennsylvania 15-Nov-1777
Battle of Monmouth New Jersey 28-Jun-1778
Battle of Rhode Island Rhode Island 29-Aug-1778
Battle of Savannah Georgia 29-Dec-1778
Battle of Stony Point New York 15-Jul-1779
Siege of Savannah Georgia 20-Oct-1779
Siege of Charleston South Carolina 12-May-1780
Battle of Waxhaws South Carolina 29-May-1780
Battle of Camden South Carolina 16-Aug-1780
Battle of Kings Mountain South Carolina 07-Oct-1780
Battle of Cowpens South Carolina 17-Jan-1781
Battle of Guilford Courthouse North Carolina 15-Mar-1781
Battle of Chesapeake Capes Chesapeake Bay 05-Sep-1781
Battle of Groton Heights Connecticut 06-Sep-1781
Battle of Eutaw Springs South Carolina 08-Sep-1781
Siege of Yorktown Virginia 19-Oct-1781

There is a symmetry between the folly of Burgoyne’s march south to Saratoga and that of Cornwallis’s march north to Yorktown. Military historians debate why Burgoyne risked marching south from Fort Edward in the same way that they question why Cornwallis advanced north beyond North Carolina into Virginia. Although Cornwallis had none of the outward vanity of Burgoyne, the two men were similar in that they were both junior generals and neither of them was commander in chief of the British army in America. Both blamed their subsequent failures on rigid orders and insufficient latitude. They both expected to march through predominantly friendly territory. They both ignored the chain of command and went over the heads of their superiors to communicate independently with Lord George Germain. They both allowed their supply lines to become overextended and their forces suffered harassment by enemy militia. They presided over the two most decisive defeats of the American Revolutionary War.

Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy
The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire (2013)