Places to Visit

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Connecticut
Place City Sort descending
Nathan Hale Homestead Coventry Built in 1776 and restored.
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park Groton The site of the Battle of Groton Heights (1781).
Yale University Art Gallery New Haven Home to one of the finest collections of early American art anywhere, it was founded in 1832 when John Trumbull gave more than one hundred of his portraits and historical paintings to Yale. Renovation and expansion completed in 2012.
Nathan Hale Schoolhouse New London The schoolhouse where Nathan Hale taught.
Shaw Mansion New London Built by Nathaniel Shaw; used by both Washington and Lafayette during the war.
General William Hart House Old Saybrook Built in 1767 and restored to its original condition, it is Old Saybrook Historical Society’s museum and headquarters.
Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum Wethersfield Three separate homes comprising a single museum, including the homes of Silas Deane, a member of the Continental Congress, and Joseph Webb; Washington and Rochambeau met there to lay out strategy.

There is a symmetry between the folly of Burgoyne’s march south to Saratoga and that of Cornwallis’s march north to Yorktown. Military historians debate why Burgoyne risked marching south from Fort Edward in the same way that they question why Cornwallis advanced north beyond North Carolina into Virginia. Although Cornwallis had none of the outward vanity of Burgoyne, the two men were similar in that they were both junior generals and neither of them was commander in chief of the British army in America. Both blamed their subsequent failures on rigid orders and insufficient latitude. They both expected to march through predominantly friendly territory. They both ignored the chain of command and went over the heads of their superiors to communicate independently with Lord George Germain. They both allowed their supply lines to become overextended and their forces suffered harassment by enemy militia. They presided over the two most decisive defeats of the American Revolutionary War.

Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy
The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire (2013)