General

Continental Army general — one of Washington’s best; 1726—1783.
Talented Continental Army general who defected to the British; 1741—1801.
British playwright, politician; general who lost the Battles of Saratoga; 1722—92.
Governor of Quebec; British commander-in-chief, 1782 - 83; 1724—1808.
French general, liaison between Rochambeau and Washington; 1734—88.
Soldier, politician, New York governor, vice president under Jefferson and Madison; 1739—1812.
British general; commander-in-chief, 1778—82; 1730—95.
British general, surrendered with troops at Yorktown; 1738—1805.
German general; died at the Battle of Fort Mercer.
British general, Royal Governor of Massachusetts, ordered troops to Concord; 1719/20—87.

The British red coat (which gave the British soldiers the soubriquet of lobsterback) had been instituted in 1660 and was not to leave the battlefield until 1882. It was the national corporate logo, and arrayed beneath it were subordinate brands — the regiments with their facing colors (the contrast color of the lapel and cuff), connected to the mother brand but differentiated.

Michael Stephenson
Patriot Battles: How the War of Independence Was Fought (2007)