Portraits of British

All  |  People You Should Know

Artists  |  British  |  Colonials  |  Enslaved People  |  French  |  Germans  |  Natives  |  Spanish  |  Others

Home Government

Military

  • John AndréBritish officer, hung for his involvement in Benedict Arnold’s treason
  • John BurgoyneBritish playwright, politician; general who lost the Battles of Saratoga
  • Henry ClintonBritish general; commander-in-chief, 1778 - 82
  • Charles CornwallisBritish general, surrendered with troops at Yorktown
  • Richard HoweBritish admiral, brother of William Howe
  • William HoweCommander-in-chief of British forces, 1775 - 78
  • Banastre TarletonBritish officer of the cavalry, notorious for his exploits in the South

Military Governors

  • Guy CarletonGovernor of Quebec; British commander-in-chief, 1782 - 83
  • Thomas GageBritish general, Royal Governor of MA, ordered troops to Concord

[Of those opposed to slavery,] George Washington belonged, with Mason and Jefferson, in the hardest category — disapproving owners. Theirs was the most difficult position to maintain, psychologically and rhetorically. It would not be maintained over the next sixty years, as southern antislavery rhetoric withered. Practically and politically, disapproving owners were in the hardest position from which to achieve their goals. How do you weaken an institution in which you and all your neighbors are enmeshed? Washington did enough, finally, to free his own slaves, which was more than many owners in his position did. Jefferson never freed all his, nor did any of the other slave-owning presidents.

Richard Brookhiser
Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington (1996)